Alumni

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GMA alumni, along with Montessori-educated students worldwide, excel across learning and career fields. Famous Montessorians include Anne Frank, Julia Child, Wikipedia Founder Jimmy Wales, and Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin.

We encourage our past students and parents to let us know how they’re doing. Scroll through our testimonials and see what people are saying about GMA.

Also, Association Montessori Internationale has launched a “We are Montessori” initiative on their website. AMI is collecting information to showcase successful alumni and the schools that fostered their education.

GMA Alumni Testimonials

I’m the proud mother of two young ladies who have a very strong sense of self, individualism, generosity, sensitivity and kindness. I know that these traits were learned, reinforced and nourished here at Global. The foundation in education, as well as life, is something we will always cherish. Certainly it is the incredible staff and wonderful families that create the environment. Thank you!
–Siobahn Lesley

GMA has provided an extremely nurturing yet challenging learning environment. The open, non-shaming and non-threatening approach allows each child to develop a strong sense of self and individualism. Thanks to everyone for such a great experience.
–Patty Johnson and Mark Wourms

It’s encouraging for us as parents when our son, Miles, wants to stay at school when we come to pick him up. He is so happy here and we truly appreciate everything that GMA supports and gives to the students. We couldn’t be more pleased!
–Steven and Trudi Patterson

We have been involved in GMA as parents since 1997. We entered GMA needing a ‘day care,’ but quickly came to understand that GMA had much more to offer. Most importantly, GMA’s teaching and philosophy provided a common language that allowed us to be consistent communicators with our two-year old. We were surprised that Montessori Language facilitated such positive behavioral results… for the boys and for us as parents.
–Rob and Robin Linscott

I am a proud Global Montessori advocate. Back in my day, it was called “Plaza Light School” otherwise little has changed. A shining student of 1988, I still have the crinkled all-school picture we took, me in the back row with a mouth open laughing. It still has green marker on it from my illustrations. When looking at it, I smile at the white dress and the teacher provoking my laughter. I remember the sleep-overs we had and colorful cereal the following morning and even the way the fruit loops smelled. I remember the gooey macaroni and cheese, the distinct smell of the lunch room, and the tall stairs I was afraid I would fall down. I am so proud of my heritage as a Montessori child that I took a position to assist in a summer school class in 2005. When shown the classroom I was to be working in, I felt a sense of home. During the summer, we sit on the same circle as we did during the birthday “around the world ceremony” when I was there. I take students into the tiny bathroom stalls that I needed help in. We look up at the huge doorways and feel small; we open the big windows and play music. We dig in the same play yard. I sit next to the familiar cots during naptime and watch kids try to fall asleep. I kneel to grab activities from the small shelves. I hug the kids the way I was hugged as a student. The school and I have the same energy, moving to their own beats like always. I am living in Boston working as an advocate for women’s health at the Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts. Still a fan of community learning, I live in a Quaker cooperative with an intergenerational group of people learning what it is like to shares space, food and time. I graduated from a liberal arts college in May 2006 with a degree in International Studies and spent a semester in Senegal speaking French. Clearly, I have taken the need for international perspective to heart as well as the effectiveness of hands on learning. I am thankful for my roots at this place and to know that children are in their sacred spaces at the school.
–Anna Smith